Best Young Adult Books with Mild LGBT Themes

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Dear readers, I was reading an M/M romance erotica that was really disappointing me (off with Insta-Lust’s head!) when I decided to make a list of the best Young Adult books with mild LGBT themes I’ve read in my life. (Click on the covers to buy.)

Here it goes. Continue reading

Best of the Saddest Young Adult Books

Best of the Saddest Young Adult Books

Dear readers, having recently experienced some drama in my personal life – the sad kind – I felt inspired to make a list of the best of the saddest young adult books that I have read.

Let’s get to it!

10 – The Perks of Being a Wallflower

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This book’s atmosphere in general made me sad. It’s an extremely beautifully-written story focusing on Charlie’s emotional responses to diverse situations and his overall thoughts about the world around him. Continue reading

Review: Brokeback Mountain by Annie Proulx

1627Brokeback Mountain by Annie Proulx

My rating: 3 of 5 stars
Received: Borrowed
Publication Date: October 13th 1997
Publisher: Scribner
Point of View: 3rd Person & Alternative
Recommended Age: 16+
Genres &  Themes: Adult, M/M Romance, Western, Short Story, Sacrifice, Forbidden Love, Historical Romance, True Love, LGBT

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BLURB:

Annie Proulx has written some of the most original and brilliant short stories in contemporary literature, and for many readers and reviewers, “Brokeback Mountain” is her masterpiece.

Ennis del Mar and Jack Twist, two ranch hands, come together when they’re working as sheepherder and camp tender one summer on a range above the tree line. At first, sharing an isolated tent, the attraction is casual, inevitable, but something deeper catches them that summer.

Both men work hard, marry, and have kids because that’s what cowboys do. But over the course of many years and frequent separations this relationship becomes the most important thing in their lives, and they do anything they can to preserve it.

The New Yorker won the National Magazine Award for Fiction for its publication of “Brokeback Mountain,” and the story was included in Prize Stories 1998: The O. Henry Awards. In gorgeous and haunting prose, Proulx limns the difficult, dangerous affair between two cowboys that survives everything but the world’s violent intolerance.

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Captive Prince Video Review

Dear readers,

Captive Prince is one of my favorite series. So, obviously, I HAD to make a video with me endlessly talking about it. *wink*

Hope you enjoy!

Youtube | Twitter | Instagram | Google+ | Goodreads

Interview: C.S. Pacat (Kings Rising)

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Would you say that writing the third and final book in the Captive Prince trilogy was more arduous than writing the first two ones?

It was the most enjoyable to write, but simultaneously the most technically demanding. The greatest challenge was making certain that the book hit all of the right notes, and was a satisfying conclusion to the series. But I loved writing it. It was incredibly exciting for me to have reached that point–there are so many climactic scenes in Kings Rising that, for three books, I had been yearning to write. Continue reading

Review: Carry the Ocean (The Roosevelt #1) by Heidi Cullinan

Carry the Ocean by Heidi Cullinan

My rating: 4 of 5 stars
Received: Bought
Publication Date: April 7th 2015
Publisher: Samhain Publishing, Ltd
Point of View: 1st Person, Masculine & Alternative
Recommended Age: 14+
Genres & Themes: Adult, Contemporary, Psychological, Mystery

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Normal is just a setting on the dryer.

High school graduate Jeremey Samson is looking forward to burying his head under the covers and sleeping until it’s time to leave for college. Then a tornado named Emmet Washington enters his life. The double major in math and computer science is handsome, forward, wicked smart, interested in dating Jeremey—and he’s autistic.

But Jeremey doesn’t judge him for that. He’s too busy judging himself, as are his parents, who don’t believe in things like clinical depression. When his untreated illness reaches a critical breaking point, Emmet is the white knight who rescues him and brings him along as a roommate to The Roosevelt, a quirky new assisted living facility nearby.

As Jeremey finds his feet at The Roosevelt, Emmet slowly begins to believe he can be loved for the man he is behind the autism. But before he can trust enough to fall head over heels, he must trust his own conviction that friendship is a healing force, and love can overcome any obstacle.

Warning: Contains characters obsessed with trains and counting, positive representations of autism and mental illness, a very dark moment, and Elwood Blues. Continue reading

Review: Loving Jay by Renae Kaye

Loving Jay by Renae Kaye

My rating: 4 of 5 stars
Received: Bought
Publication Date: April 18th 2014
Publisher: Dreamspinner Press
Point of View: 1st Person & Masculine
Recommended Age: 14+
Genres & Themes: New Adult, Contemporary, M/M romance, Humor, Disability

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One thing Liam Turner knows for sure is that he’s not gay—after all, his father makes it very clear he’ll allow no son of his to be gay. And Liam believes it, until a chance meeting with James “Jay” Bell turns Liam’s world upside-down. Jay is vivacious and unabashedly gay—from the tips of his bleached hair to the ends of his polished nails. With a flair for fashion, overreaction, and an inability to cork his verbal diarrhea, Liam believes drama queen Jay must have a screw loose.

An accident as a teenager left Liam with a limp and a fear of driving. He can’t play football anymore either, and that makes him feel like less of a man. But that’s no reason to question his sexuality… unless the accident broke something else inside him. When being with Jay causes Liam’s protective instincts to emerge, Liam starts to believe all he knew in life had been a convenient excuse to stay hidden. From intolerance to confrontations, Liam must learn to overcome his fears—and his father—before he can accept his sexuality and truly love Jay. Continue reading

LGBT Recommendations for You ❤

LGBT is one of my ultimate favorites genres out there, thus, I decided to share with you some of my most memorable reads. Maybe, just maybe, you’ll find one or two, from this list, that you’d be interested in reading.

(Click on cover for review and/or Goodreads.)

New York Times  bestselling author David Levithan tells the based-on-true-events story of Harry and Craig, two 17-year-olds who are about to take part in a 32-hour marathon of kissing to set a new Guinness World Record—all of which is narrated by a Greek Chorus of the generation of gay men lost to AIDS.

While the two increasingly dehydrated and sleep-deprived boys are locking lips, they become a focal point in the lives of other teen boys dealing with languishing long-term relationships, coming out, navigating gender identity, and falling deeper into the digital rabbit hole of gay hookup sites—all while the kissing former couple tries to figure out their own feelings for each other. Continue reading

Review: Tell Me It’s Real by T.J. Klune

Tell Me It’s Real by T.J. Klune

My rating: 3 of 5 stars
Received: Bought
Publication Date: February 15th 2013
Publisher: Dreamspinner Press
Point of View: 1st Person & Masculine
Recommended Age: 16+
Genres & Themes: Adult, M/M romance, Contemporary

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Do you believe in love at first sight?

Paul Auster doesn’t. Paul doesn’t believe in much at all. He’s thirty, slightly overweight, and his best features are his acerbic wit and the color commentary he provides as life passes him by. His closest friends are a two-legged dog named Wheels and a quasibipolar drag queen named Helena Handbasket. He works a dead-end job in a soul-sucking cubicle, and if his grandmother’s homophobic parrot insults him one more time, Paul is going to wring its stupid neck.

Enter Vince Taylor.

Vince is everything Paul isn’t: sexy, confident, and dumber than the proverbial box of rocks. And for some reason, Vince pursues Paul relentlessly. Vince must be messing with him, because there is no way Vince could want someone like Paul.

But when Paul hits Vince with his car—in a completely unintentional if-he-died-it’d-only-be-manslaughter kind of way—he’s forced to see Vince in a whole new light. The only thing stopping Paul from believing in Vince is himself—and that is one obstacle Paul can’t quite seem to overcome. But when tragedy strikes Vince’s family, Paul must put aside any notions he has about himself and stand next to the man who thinks he’s perfect the way he is.

Continue reading