Review: The Working Elf Blues by Piper Vaughn


The Working Elf Blues by Piper Vaughn

My rating: 4 of 5 stars
Received: NetGalley
Publication Date: December 17th 2014
Publisher: Less Than Three Press
Genres & Themes: Young Adult, Fantasy, M/M romance, Christmas.

BLURB:

Garnet Evergreen has never heard of an elf abandoning the North Pole for a human, but he yearns to be the first. Ever since he saw Wes, the boy with sorrowful eyes, Garnet felt an undeniable kinship. Over the years, he’s watched that boy grow into a man, and now he’s determined to give Wes a Christmas he’ll never forget. If only Garnet had thought to test his father’s sleigh before leaving…

Orphaned as a child, Wes spends every Christmas alone at his cabin. When he’s woken by a suspicious boom and finds a wrecked sleigh and an unconscious elf, he doesn’t know how to react. Wes isn’t fanciful. He doesn’t give much credence to the stories about Santa Claus and flying reindeer. But a part of him wants desperately to believe when Garnet promises forever, even if life has taught him that no one ever stays…

REVIEW:

description
What a charming Christmas story.

Garnet is in love. With a human. And rarely can he be with him, since Santa needs his expertise at the toy workshop. Being an elf isn’t always easy and Garnet’s heart is yearning for him to be close to Wes again. Every five years, he manages to disobey Santa and visit the man of his dreams. Except, this Christmas, he doesn’t just want to spend a night with him.

He wants to be his forever.

Would Wes accept him? Fall in love with an elf? But what if Santa catches him first?

How lovely, this was really worth putting every other nine books that I had started aside in order to fully cave into this one heart-warming, simple and full of ambience short story.

Even though it does contain some elements belonging to the fantasy genre, this feels very much like a realistic wonder nonetheless. I also dare think that those who usually only enjoy contemporary stories would find themselves not minding all that much the aspects not fitting in that category.

Because the romance is that touching. What was most sparkly about it was seeing lonely and reclusive Wes open up a little and bringing himself to care for Garnet, a man he never forgot himself.

I guess I understand why there wasn’t any slow-burn, really, since they did know each other for fifteen years. But, still, I would have appreciated – loved – some slow-pacing toward the romance and, of preference, several sexual tensioned scenes.

The writing was quite good! I never read a novel by this author before, so I definitely didn’t know how much imagination and talent she does have. Now that I am aware of that fact, I will eagerly try another of her works sometime soon.

There are barely any secondary characters, but they weren’t needed exactly. The story is about our main ones and those were the characters I wanted to focus on, anyway. If that is something you precisely need in a story though, you may find yourself searching for them, because they do not appear early on, but I am positive the romance will steal your attention, if it works for you from the beginning.

How can one resist hug-worthy dogs in a narrative? Clever author.

It felt too short! My heart claims for more! I think this would be splendid to pick up, when wanting to be in the Christmas ambience. Love, friendship, warmth, gifts and kisses included in this one sweet short story.

Advertisements

9 thoughts on “Review: The Working Elf Blues by Piper Vaughn

  1. A Christmas story with magic, finally! You’re reading nine books at once?! I can barely keep two straight. This sounds like a good romance, I wish there was more fantasy though. *whispers* Is Santa the bad guy?

    Like

  2. SO any comments on elf porn? PLEASEEEE ^_^ That cover is butt-ugly but the author’s name is so cute. And the plot. I’ll come back to this one when I’m in need of some romance. (It happens, sadly. Natural urges I can’t escape.)

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s